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Career advice: Resignation

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While resigning is a huge career decision - it’s still just another business process and one that everyone has been through. Avoid any nervousness by being well prepared for questions you may be asked by your current boss. Good planning will help to navigate a potentially awkward conversation.


 
 

What to consider when thinking about moving to a new job

  • Are you committed to leaving?

  • Weigh up the pros and cons and be clear with your reasons

  • Have you investigated all opportunities within your current organisation?

  • Would you leave if you were offered more money or a promotion?

  • Will you be better off in your new job regarding money, location, career and persona development?

 

Where possible, have your notice ready in writing to hand deliver

Include that after careful consideration you have decided to leave the company. Clearly state the number of weeks’ notice you will work and your last date with the company. Keep it confidential – your boss will appreciate being the one to decide who else to tell, how and when to break the news.

Be professional with your reasons for leaving

Focus on the new job and what it can offer you. If there is anything negative to say then save that for your exit interview. If you are leaving on good terms, or are particularly sorry to be leaving behind valued colleagues and friends, can go a long way and costs nothing. Be prepared for a negative reaction, you are just resigning and this has an impact on your bosses working life.

Discuss it with your recruiter

Having spent time getting to know you, your consultant can provide additional advice on how to tackle this head on. Ask yourself a few questions: What are the pros and cons of your present job compared to the new one? Would you leave if you were offered more money or a promotion? If something made you unhappy about the job – what was the reason and is there an opportunity for the problem to resurface in the new job?

How to tell your boss

Be gracious – tell them how much you’ve enjoyed working with them and that you’ve learned a lot. Be co-operative and ensure your boss you will do all you can to make sure the handover is a smooth transition. Work out what you are going to say and then stick to it. Thank your boss and focus on the positives of the job. If you must tackle anything negative then be constructive. Always leave the meeting on a good note – people remember the first and last impression people make.

The counter offer

This can be a process in changing jobs. The fact you are ready to leave your company probably already rules out considering a counter offer but until it’s in front of you, it’s hard to know how you will react. Ask for a written offer signed by your top manager. Regardless of how you feel about the job always give yourself time to think it through before making a decision.

Related career advice

If you would like to discuss on how to approach your resignation further, contact your local Hays office

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